Starting March 28th of this year, all the previous child support rules in Ohio will change. Child Support is calculated from a set of economic tables which contained data based off of economic conditions from the 1980s. This means that people in Ohio, up until March of this year, were paying child support based off of economic conditions that existed in the 1980s. The Ohio Legislature determined over the last 26 years that Ohio child support payers were not able to afford the payments that they were ordered to make. To address this issue, the new child support rules provide payors a “self-sufficiency” reserve, which is essentially a reserved amount of income left over for the payor to use to support themselves. Click on the link below to review the new worksheet (see page 37). The shaded areas on the worksheet represent the income levels that have a “self-sufficiency” reserve calculated in to the amount of child support the payor is required to pay. Here is an example of how to read the worksheet: Suppose Mother is the child support “obligor”, meaning Mother must pay child support. Mother’s income is $45,000. Mother and Father have three children. According to the worksheet, Mother would pay $9,366 per year. Mother’s support obligation is in the shaded area of the table so Mother’s support includes a “self-sufficiency” reserve allowing her a little extra income so that she can support herself as well as her three children in Father’s household. Since Mother’s income is in the shaded area, she is also entitled to a “cap” on the amount of daycare she will be expected to reimburse Father for (which would be calculated into her expected child support obligation). This daycare cap will be discussed later on in this blog series. If you have questions about your current child support obligation or a future obligation, please feel free to contact our office at 513-228-0407 to schedule a consultation.

ODJFS Child Support Guideline Manual